News

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

5 days ago

Sana Mare

We are on a mission to clean beaches and rivers from civilisation waste while reducing poverty at the same time. With our social clean-up project we offer job opportunities for people living in poverty in Africa and Asia. Here our team from Limuru Kenya is cleaning a part of the Kiambu river. The team would like to do many more clean-ups. We rely on donations to continue the project. Please support us with a small donation. sana-mare.org/aktivitaeten/social-cleanups/ ... WeiterlesenSee Less

1 week ago

Sana Mare

There are five #garbagepatches around the world. The largest one, also known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch covers more than 1.6 million square kilometers.

But did you also know that most ocean trash actually sits on the bottom?


„As unsightly as #oceanpollution is, what we can’t see may be worse: 70 percent of ocean garbage actually sinks to the #seafloor, meaning we’re unlikely to ever be able to clean it up“.

Source: conservation.org
... WeiterlesenSee Less

There are five #garbagepatches around the world. The largest one, also known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch covers more than 1.6 million square kilometers. 

But did you also know that most ocean trash actually sits on the bottom? 


„As unsightly as #oceanpollution is, what we can’t see may be worse: 70 percent of ocean garbage actually sinks to the #seafloor, meaning we’re unlikely to ever be able to clean it up“. 

Source: conservation.org

2 weeks ago

Sana Mare

Some of the bottles that were collected in our clean-ups in Kenya are now used for agricultural purposes. Please support our clean-up team in Limuru sana-mare.org/aktivitaeten/team-limuru/ ... WeiterlesenSee Less

2 weeks ago

Sana Mare

July is #PlasticFreeMonth 💙

Time to make an impact and reduce our daily usage of plastic. There are so many great reusable products on the market - it is time to stop wasting plastic.
... WeiterlesenSee Less

July is #plasticfreemonth  💙

Time to make an impact and reduce our daily usage of plastic. There are so many great reusable products on the market - it is time to stop wasting plastic.

3 weeks ago

Sana Mare

We help people in Africa and Asia who live in poverty. The aid money is not given away, but paid as an expense allowance for collecting rubbish from bodies of water. We combine poverty reduction and environmental protection with the project.

Why?
Most of the plastic in the ocean is brought in by rivers from Asia and Africa. Many countries on these continents lack a functioning and comprehensive infrastructure for waste management. Rivers are therefore often used as natural conveyor belts that carry the waste out of the cities.

It is not surprising that the greatest environmental #Pollution from civilisation waste comes from the poorest countries in the world. For example, in Nairobi, the capital of #kenya. Around 3.5 million people live there, 60 percent of them in slums. The inhabitants of the slums fight #hunger and disease every day. There is no time or energy to think about environmentally friendly waste management. The Nairobi River is therefore the most reasonable disposal option from the point of view of the #poorpeople .

What we do:
The removal of improperly disposed waste must go hand in hand with the reduction of #poverty. #sanamare therefore pursues the approach of social cleanups. We organize #cleanups on beaches, coasts and rivers. Besides a small number of volunteers, the work is mainly carried out by men and women living in poverty. The men and women receive a fair daily wage for their participation.

The social cleanups have three positive effects for #fightinhpoverty and #marineconservation .
1. Litter is removed from coasts and shores before it ends up in the ocean.
2. The helpers can concentrate on the litter problem for at least one day while they receive a fair wage.
3. Awareness of the problem is raised among the poor.

We work with permanent teams on a long-term basis. The helpers are thus offered paid work at regular intervals. This reduces the poverty of the people at least a little bit. Here you see Caroline Wamayi from our #cleanup team in #mombasa
The collected waste is disposed of properly. If possible, the recyclable waste is sold to recycling companies. 100% of the income generated in this way flows back into the project.
... WeiterlesenSee Less

We help people in Africa and Asia who live in poverty. The aid money is not given away, but paid as an expense allowance for collecting rubbish from bodies of water. We combine poverty reduction and environmental protection with the project.

Why?
Most of the plastic in the ocean is brought in by rivers from Asia and Africa. Many countries on these continents lack a functioning and comprehensive infrastructure for waste management. Rivers are therefore often used as natural conveyor belts that carry the waste out of the cities. 

It is not surprising that the greatest environmental #pollution from civilisation waste comes from the poorest countries in the world. For example, in Nairobi, the capital of #Kenya. Around 3.5 million people live there, 60 percent of them in slums. The inhabitants of the slums fight #hunger and disease every day. There is no time or energy to think about environmentally friendly waste management. The Nairobi River is therefore the most reasonable disposal option from the point of view of the #poorpeople .

What we do:
The removal of improperly disposed waste must go hand in hand with the reduction of #poverty. #SanaMare therefore pursues the approach of social cleanups. We organize #cleanups on beaches, coasts and rivers. Besides a small number of volunteers, the work is mainly carried out by men and women living in poverty. The men and women receive a fair daily wage for their participation.

The social cleanups have three positive effects for #fightinhpoverty and #marineconservation .
1. Litter is removed from coasts and shores before it ends up in the ocean.
2. The helpers can concentrate on the litter problem for at least one day while they receive a fair wage.
3. Awareness of the problem is raised among the poor.

We work with permanent teams on a long-term basis. The helpers are thus offered paid work at regular intervals. This reduces the poverty of the people at least a little bit. Here you see Caroline Wamayi from our #cleanup team in #Mombasa
The collected waste is disposed of properly. If possible, the recyclable waste is sold to recycling companies. 100% of the income generated in this way flows back into the project.
Mehr Laden